Alan Jackson’s Famous Country Line Dancing song: “Chattahoochee” — Live Grand Ole Opry

Watch Alan Jackson live performance of his hit song “Chattahoochee” at the Grand Ole Opry. This song received CMA awards for “Single of the Year” and “Song of the Year.” It was released in May 1993 as the third single from his album A Lot About Livin’ (And a Little ’bout Love). Alan Jackson wrote this song with Jim McBride.

About Alan Jackson

Alan Jackson was born in the small town of Newnan, Georgia, on October 17, 1958. He grew up singing gospel music, both in church and at home with his family. As a teenager, he performed locally as part of a country duo. He left school to work and married his high-school sweetheart, Denise, who worked as an airline stewardess. In 1989, Jackson became the first artist signed to Arista’s new country division. Jackson’s debut album, Here in the Real World, was issued in 1990. It became a platinum-selling hit on the strength of four Top Five hits. He also released “Chasin’ That Neon Rainbow,” “Wanted,” and “I’d Love You All Over Again.” He shot to full-fledged superstardom with the follow-up, 1991’s Don’t Rock the Jukebox. This song was number one smash that year. Jackson’s many industry awards include the CMA award for entertainer of the year in 1995, 2002, and 2003. In addition, he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2017.

Chattahoochee

Way down yonder on the Chattahoochee
It gets hotter than a hoochie coochie
We laid rubber on the Georgia asphalt
We got a little crazy but we never got caught

Down by the river on a Friday night
A pyramid of cans in the pale moonlight
Talking ’bout cars and dreaming ’bout women
Never had a plan just a livin’ for the minute
Yeah way down yonder on the Chattahoochee
Never knew how much that muddy water meant to me
But I learned how to swim and I learned who I was
A lot about livin’ and a little ’bout love

Well we fogged up the windows in my old Chevy
I was willing but she wasn’t ready
So I settled for a burger and a grape snow cone
Dropped her off early but I didn’t go home

Down by the river on a Friday night
A pyramid of cans in the pale moonlight
Talking ’bout cars and dreaming ’bout women
Never had a plan just a livin’ for the minute
Yeah way down yonder on the Chattahoochee
Never knew how much that muddy water meant to me
But I learned how to swim and I learned who I was
A lot about livin’ and a little ’bout love

Yeah, way down yonder on the Chattahochee
Never knew how much that muddy water meant to me
But I learned how to swim and I learned who I was
A lot about livin’ and a little ’bout love.

A lot about livin’ and a little ’bout love.

Source: LyricFind Songwriters: Jim Mcbride / Alan Jackson

Chattahoochee lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc

Tags: Alan Jackson, Alan Jackson music, Country Song, Country music, top country

From George Strait Latest Concert: Singing “Waymore’s Blues” – A Waylon Jennings Song Austin, Texas, Zilker Park, ACL Festival

Here is one of George Strait latest performances in a concert! He surprised the massive crowd at the festival with a cover of a country hit song of Waylon Jennings’ entitled “Waymore’s Blues.” It was at Austin City Limits Festival at Zilker Park in Austin, Texas. Watch the epic performance below.

About George Strait

George Strait is the undeniable “King of Country Music.” His music career spans more than 30 years; includes 60 No. 1 singles, more than any other artist in any genre and boasts 33 platinum or multi-platinum-selling albums, more than any country artist and third across all genres behind only The Beatles and Elvis Presley. Strait is the only act in history to have a Top 10 hit every year for over three decades and has sold more than 70 million albums and earned more than 60 major entertainment industry awards.

Waymore’s Blues

Waylon Jennings

Well, I woke up this mornin’ it was drizzlin’ rain
Around the curve come a passanger train
Heard somebody yodel and a hobo moan
Jimmy he’s dead, he’s been a long time gone
Been a long time gone, a long time gone

If you wanna get to heaven, gotta D-I-E
You gotta put on your coat and T-I-E
Wanna get the rabbit out of the L-O-G
You gotta make a cold motion like D-O-G
Like D-O-G
Like D-O-G
YeahWell, I got a good woman, what’s the matter with me?
What makes me wanna love every woman I see?
I was tri’fling when I met her now I’m tri’fling again
And every woman she sees looks like the place I came in
Looks like the place I came in
Yeah (ooh)
Place I came in

I got my name painted on my shirt
I ain’t no ordinary dude
I don’t have to work
I don’t have to work

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Waylon Jennings / Curtis Buck

Waymore’s Blues lyrics © Hall Clement Publishing, Waylon Jennings Music, Universal – Songs Of Polygram International Inc, Words & Music Copyright Admn Obo Waylon Jennings Music

Posted here for Educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. Contact us if you want this to be removed.

Tags: George Strait, George Strait Concert, George Strait music, country music, top country songs

Unforgettable Father & Daughter Duet: Alan Jackson and Daughter Ali Jackson Bradshaw “You’ll Always Be My Baby”

This is a very memorable Father and Daughter duet from Country Superstar Alan Jackson singing with his daughter Ali Jackson Bradshaw. Alan Jackson wrote “You’ll Always Be My Baby (Written for Daughters’ Weddings)” several years ago for a very special occasion. They performed live at their hometown show at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. In an interview, Alan said: “I wrote the song for Mattie’s wedding the summer of 2017, but it was so hard to do. I told ’em, ‘I wrote this for all of you.’” Enjoy!

About Alan Jackson

Alan Jackson was born in the small town of Newnan, Georgia, on October 17, 1958. He grew up singing gospel music, both in church and at home with his family. As a teenager, he performed locally as part of a country duo. He left school to work and married his high-school sweetheart, Denise, who worked as an airline stewardess. In 1989, Jackson became the first artist signed to Arista’s new country division. Jackson’s debut album, Here in the Real World, was issued in 1990. It became a platinum-selling hit on the strength of four Top Five hits. He also released “Chasin’ That Neon Rainbow,” “Wanted,” and “I’d Love You All Over Again.” He shot to full-fledged superstardom with the follow-up, 1991’s Don’t Rock the Jukebox. This song was number one smash that year. Jackson’s many industry awards include the CMA award for entertainer of the year in 1995, 2002, and 2003. In addition, he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2017.

You’ll Always Be My Baby (Written for Daughters’ Weddings)

Alan Jackson

First steps, first words
Seems like yesterday you were just a girl
Skinned knees, climbing trees
All those memories so close to me

Now you’re a woman on your own
All in love and nearly gone

But you’ll always be my baby
No matter where you are
You’ll always be my baby
Forever in my heart16, first car
21 and there’s a broken heart
High heels, strong will
In my eyes I see a young child still

But you’re a woman on your own
All in love and nearly gone

But you’ll always be my baby
No matter where you are
You’ll always be my baby
Forever in my heart

So I say a prayer every day
That God will guide you as you find your way
You know that I’m near
Anytime my love is always here

‘Cause you’ll always be my baby
No matter where you are
You’ll always be my baby
Forever in my heart…

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Alan Eugene Jackson

Tags: Alan Jackson, Alan Jackson music, Country Song, Country music, top country